D. Hou

Daqing Hou

Associate Professor
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
Computer Science Department (Courtesy Appointment)
Clarkson University
Potsdam, New York 13699-5720
dhou clarkson edu

Curriculum Vitae (brief, 2011 version) Research Statement (long)

Publications: DBLP (a subset of my papers) Papers in PDF Google Scholar Citations

Software Engineering Research Laboratory

I am always looking for outstanding students to work with. (Graduate students already at Clarkson must take my courses in order to have me as advisor.) One RA position available in Fall 2014

Students and Theses

Useful links for my undergrad advisees

EE261 Fall 2013: Introduction to Software Design and Programming

EE408 Fall 2013: Software Design for Visual Environments



Research

I am fascinated by the intellectual challenge of understanding and controlling the psychological complexity of software engineering. As such, I have broad interests in all aspects of software engineering. Current interests include improving the effectiveness of software reuse through better developer tools, API usability and evolution, copy-and-paste programming, and their corresponding support inside IDEs. I am also interested in developing software solutions for engineering problems, cyber-physical systems, and in application of statistical learning techniques. A Recent Research Overview Presentation (pdf)

My work has been supported by AFRL, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures via Avra Software Lab., Alcoa, CITeR, IBM, NSF, and NYSERDA.



Teaching

EE261: Introduction to Programming and Software Design, Fall 2009/2010/2011

EE408: Software Design for Visual Environments, Fall 2007/2008/2009/2010/2011

EE564: Enterprise Software Development, Spring 2007; Spring 2009; Spring 2012

EE569: Program Analysis for Software Engineering, Fall 2006; Spring 2008; Spring 2010; Spring 2011

EE610: ECE Seminar, Fall 2007 and Spring 2008


Resources for Graduate Students

I choose to teach software engineering for several reasons. I believe that talented minds are the single most important factor that contributes to software success, and education is the key to producing such talents. I believe that advances in software engineering research require continuous reflection from software researchers; in this regard, classrooms can be a better-controlled place than most industrial environments. Finally, helping students succeed provides me with both a source of satisfaction and a sense of achievement.



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